The Kitchen

The kitchen has been the longest-running project.  We built the cabinets all by hand – with no plans to follow, and no idea what we were doing!  We get complements on them constantly – they really came out great – and fit right in with our cabin!

The kitchen is mostly completed as of today (11/16/2013)…but we still need to complete the ceiling (we are going to do a tin ceiling), get hardware for the cabinets, and complete the chinking on 3 walls of the kitchen and adjoining pantry.

The kitchen when we originally looked at the house…

223 chicagami 052

The kitchen during the demolition…

photo (1)

IMG_2411

Building the cabinets

IMG_3465

…and the kitchen as of 11/16/13

DSC08599

DSC08584

Copper farm sink…Brian’s pick!

DSC08585

Other end of the kitchen

Adjoining pantry/laundry room (still needing the chinking in between the logs down as well as the ceiling)

DSC08588

2019

Chinking (white stuff!) getting done in the kitchen:

DSC02354

2018:  The “tin” ceiling going up!

 

 

2019

 

Kitchen Wall

One of the walls in our kitchen was nothing but rotted logs (from old roof leakage) and  a very tiny window.  We had the logs on hand, but hadn’t gotten around to replacing the wall. Friends of ours called us one morning to tell us they were removing a large window from their home to replace with a larger window, and that they thought we may be able to use it…well, it was a perfect size, and we dropped what we were doing that day, and ripped out the wall and old window!

Rotted logs and old window removed
photo 1 (1)

 

New window in and trimmed, and new logs installed…just need to stain the logs, and chink in between logsphoto 2 (1)

2019:  Farm table and chinking/trim complete

The Bar

More paneling on walls and ceiling to rip out… this room was a “treat”…we discovered to bats behind the paneling while ripping it out…quite the experience – and something I will NEVER forget!

The bar before…

photo 3 (1)

Bye Bye paneling….!IMG_2339

IMG_2342

Bats…YIKES! Brian brought them safely out of our house!

IMG_2337

With the paneling gone, it’s on to stripping the bark off the logs, sanding them down, staining the logs, securing loose wires, repairing the chinking, and painting the chinking!IMG_2345

The exposed ceiling in the bar…

IMG_2348

The bar after all the staining and painting…DSC08563

DSC08569

Wood Carvings Inside and Outside the Cabin

We love wood carvings!  Have you ever seen someone carve a tree stump with  chain saw into a work of art?  If not – it’s a must-see!  These people are really talented!  Here are some of our cabin “residents”….

This one was a gift…he greets people at our front doorDSC08575

Brian surprised me with this one for Christmas one year!

IMG_1946

 

This guy awaits visitors as they make their way to our lakeDSC08578

This was the first carving we ever bought.  This bear keeps us company in the lodge room.DSC08572

Brian gave me this one for our 2013 Anniversary gift.  This bear watches over Cello and Loki’s water and food bowls.  You can see behind the bear that part of our kitchen wall is not yet completed with the white chinking…
DSC08574

This little guy can be seen “climbing” up a tree in our front yardDSC08591

Wood Burning

Brian came home from Home Depot one day and said he had bought me a surprise…a wood burning tool that was on clearance… he thought maybe I could do some burnings on some of the logs in the house. …With great fear of sparking a flame on such  “seasoned” wood, I gave it a try anyway.  The result was a pleasant surprise!  The burnings looked really cool! I think the burnings make for nice, subtle details that are discovered sometimes by accident by visitors to our cabin.

Goose in the kitchen

DSC08567

Bass in lodge room

IMG_2816

 

Indian by stairwayIMG_2814

Bass in the making…IMG_2812

Turtle in the Lodge Room

IMG_2818

Lodge Room

Originally, the lodge room walls and ceiling were covered with painted-white paneling, and the ceiling was dropped down far enough where we could reach up and touch it.  (The actual original height of the lodge room is 21 feet). You could only see half of the 2 story stone fireplace.  After we tore all the paneling off, we had to strip the logs of the bark (by hand), sand the logs, stain the logs, re-run the wires to hide them, repair the chinking (white stuff in between the logs), and paint the chinking… it was quite the project!!  In the middle of us doing this project, we had people asking us where we are living when all this is going on… the look on their faces when we told them we were living “right here!” in the middle of this construction zone was hysterical!

Lodge Room fireplace before…
photo 4

Ripping out the paneling…

IMG_1426 - Copy

Windows behind the paneling! Awesome…light!IMG_1439

After the ceiling was exposed, the logs were stained, and the chinking was painted…IMG_2868

IMG_2864

Lodge Room Wall

When we first moved in , I kept hearing “noises” in the lodge room…after some careful inspection, and some helpful hints from our cat, Loki, we discovered a family of squirrels were living in between the  paneling and the logs.  We trapped the squirrels and relocated them (mom and 3 “kids”), and removed the paneling…to find that we were left with a log wall that hand been gnawed down, where you could see through to the outside!  With some help from family and friends, we removed a window, replaced the chewed logs with new ones, and reset the window.

Lodge Room wall with chewed logs

IMG_1704

Lodge Room wall after all the work…

DSC08580

Upstairs Room

This is another “Good-n-Plenty” pink room!  We still are not sure what we will do with this room.  We only got as far as ripping the paneling down…the logs, electric, and chinking are still in need of completion.  I couldn’t WAIT to rip this paneling down!  When we did rip this paneling down, we had a couple of unexpected discoveries… a fully intact mouse skeleton (I’ll spare you the sight, and leave that picture out!), and an inactive but huge bee hive…aaah,  the surprises keep coming!

This picture was taken after we had ripped down the drop-ceiling to expose the beams

IMG_2285

Bee hiveIMG_2278

IMG_2284

This picture was taken in the middle of the job, while we were still taking paneling down on another wall, but here you can see the logs have already been stripped of the bark beofre the paneling covered them – – so one less step down the line for us…YIPEEEEE!

IMG_2306

Porch

The 40 foot porch overlooking the lake had been screened in, and the log railings had been replaced by a plywood wall. We wanted to restore the porch to it’s original form – log railings.  We asked around town about where we could buy logs, and we were connected with a man named “Spike”…he still operates the saw mill where the original logs of this home were milled!  Generations of his family harvested cedar trees, milled them at their saw mill, and carted them by horse and buggy down the main street of our town, to the log homes that were being built here!  It was great getting some more history about our home and community from Spike!

Porch Before…

photo 5

Porch After…

DSC08570

First Project – The Roof

Why start anything inside when we have a leaky roof, right?  The first project we decided to tackle, was one of the biggest – and one that we could not tackle ourselves… the roof.  This project was quite the eye opener…a lesson learned with log cabins…no project is easy, quick, or inexpensive…and ALL projects, no matter how small, lead into 5 other projects!

We wanted the roof to look original – which meant tearing off all the layers (all 4 of them!) and insulating the roof from the exterior so that the original log beams and tongue-and-groove ceiling could be exposed in the lodge room.  What we found was that from the leaking, most of the roof was rotted – and had to be torn off! …I can’t even describe the pit in my stomach when the roofers told us the “the whole thing” was coming off… the sky’s the limit! …

 

IMG_1515

 

I’m sure the neighbors “loved” us with all the debri that was around the house for the MONTH it took to do this job!

(original estimation from roofers was 1 week!)

IMG_1500

After the exterior was torn off, looking up in the lodge room was like looking up at an old barn ceiling!
IMG_1489

Tearing out the paneled ceiling and walls in the lodge room…so that the roofers could see the roof from the inside and install the skylights.
IMG_1426 - Copy

IMG_1478

 

 

Finally done!IMG_1602

IMG_1606

Cello’s Cabin… “Beadling’s Windy Spot”

PAN July 2010In 2009 we bought our dream home – on a whim – and totally unprepared for what was in store for us.  We used to have conversations about what our dream home would be, what it would “have to have,” etc.  Well, one day, we stumbled across our ultimate dream home…a log cabin on a lake…with all the “requirements” on our once fantasy dream-home list… except it wasn’t quite in “dream-home” shape…and it didn’t quite look much like a log cabin!…

The home we purchased was a real cedar log log home, built in 1927.  It is built on a double lot, with a 2-car log constructed garage.  Some time over the years, the original logs AND ceilings of the entire home were covered over by painted-white paneling.  The original hardwood floors were covered with rug…It was infested with mice, flying squirrels (yes FLYING) – and bats (YIKES)…(all of which we finally were able to safely remove and relocate). The cabin also had an entire log wall whittled down to toothpicks  by the family of (regular) squirrels living between the paneling and logs (family of squirrels also safely relocated!).   …Aaaah…with  the adventures we encountered…I could have written a book!

Our goal: Restore it back to it’s original glory…expose all the logs, fix all the chinking (white stuff in between the logs), and make some upgrades along the way – all “DIY” style…ON OUR OWN! …  My thought at the time was “No problem!” … I swore we’d be done the home in it’s entirety in 3 years… what I quickly came to realize is that we had just purchased a life-long project! Although frustrating at times,  it has truly been one of the most rewarding things Brian and I have ever done.  The memories we have created here, both inside the home, and out on the lake, are priceless!

Posts to follow are just SOME of the things we have demolished, built, and restored!

DSC08570