Sport

Meet our Pointer Rescue, Org transport buddy, Sport!

We transported this cutie patootie on May 25, 2019.  Sport is 6.5 yr old blind Pointer and belonged to a huge hunting preserve in NC. He suffered an infection, which caused him to lose sight in one eye then the other. His owner was going to just euthanize him but an employee convinced him to let him find a home for Sport. Although he has never lived inside, Sport loves people, and craves attention. Sport is Heartworm negative.

Sport was an absolute doll during our 1 hour ride.

He loved to cuddle!

I am thrilled we were lucky enough to spend some time with this sweet soul!

5 Years Old

Hooch’s 5th Birthday

May 24, 2019

Birthday breakfast:

Spinach and goat cheese frittata , breakfast sausage, and cantaloupe

Birthday dinner:

Lamb slider with cucumber sauce, sweet potato fries (that I forgot to include in the pic!!), and apricot

Birthday dessert:

“Chocolate” chip peanut butter PUPcakes

Birthday fun:

Ice cream cone

Learning a new game for dock diving season (Speed Retrieve) with our new home made Speed Retrieve land training rig

Lamb Sliders with Cucumber Sauce

Lamb Sliders with Cucumber Sauce

INGREDIENTS:

  • Burgers
    • 1 pound ground lamb
    • 1 tablespoon organic fresh flat leaf parsley, finely chopped
    • 1 teaspoon fresh organic mint leaves, finely chopped
    • 1/2 teaspoon organic extra virgin coconut oil
  • Sauce:
    • 1 pint organic plain Greek yogurt
    • 2 medium organic cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and chopped

BURGER DIRECTIONS:

  1. Place all burger ingredients (except coconut oil) in a bowl and mix with your hands
  2. Form into “slider” sized patties
  3. Heat skillet over medium heat
  4. Add coconut oil to the skillet. Using a spatula, spread the oil over the entire bottom of the skillet
  5. When the skillet is hot, add the patties.
  6. Turn patties during frying, cooking until browned, and internal temperature reaches 160° F

SAUCE DIRECTIONS:

  1. Place yogurt and chopped cucumber in a food processor and purée

Spinach and Goat Cheese Frittata

Spinach and Goat Cheese Frittata

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 large organic eggs
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 1 teaspoon organic extra virgin coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh organic baby spinach leaves
  • 1 tablespoon organic goat cheese

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Heat a 6″ iron skillet on the stove over low heat
  2. Add the coconut oil and using a spatula, evenly coat the bottom of the skillet
  3. Crack the eggs into a mixing bowl, add the water, and whisk
  4. Add the spinach to the eggs and stir (you can add all the spinach here if you’d like, although we chose to place some pieces of the spinach on the omelet once it was in the skillet – see step 6)
  5. Pour the eggs in the skillet
  6. Place a few spinach leaves on top of the omelet
  7. Let the eggs firm up a bit, then tilt the skillet and lift the egg slightly with a spatula to allow the remaining liquid to run onto the skillet. Continue to do this until all liquid is gone
  8. Continue to cook over low heat until firm.
  9. Top with goat cheese
  10. Let cool, and cut into appropriate serving sizes for your pup

“Chocolate” Chip Peanut Butter PUPcakes

“Chocolate” Chip Peanut Butter PUPcakes

The “chocolate” chips are actually unsweetened carob chips, which are safe for dogs.  These PUPcakes seem to be an immediate favorite with our pack.  Our pups were begging for samples before the cupcakes were even out of the oven! After the PUPcakes cooled completely, a taste-test by our 4-legged Head Chef proved that these tasty treats are Cello-approved!

 

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 1/2 cups organic whole wheat flour
  • 3/4 cup organic peanut butter
    • ***Be sure the peanut butter you choose does not contain xylitol, which can be toxic to dogs
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened organic applesauce
  • 1/3 cup organic honey
  • 3 organic eggs
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened carob chips

DIRECTIONS:

  • Preheat oven to 400° F
  • Put the whole wheat flour in a bowl and set aside
  • Place peanut butter in a microwave-safe bowl, and microwave for about 10-15 seconds
  • Combine the peanut butter, applesauce, and honey.  Stir well.
  • In a small bowl, whisk the eggs.
  • Add the whisked eggs to the peanut butter mixture and stir well.
  • Slowly begin to add the flour, mixing to combine after each added portion
  • Add the carob chips and stir
  • Use a 2-Tablespoon sized cookie scooper to fill mini muffin liners.
  • Place the filled liners into a 24-cup mini muffin pan
    • if you don’t have mini cupcake liners, you can spray each muffin pan cup with an organic non-stick cooking spray before scooping in the dough to each cup
  • Bake for 10-15 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centers of each PUPcake comes out clean.
  • Let PUPcakes cool on a wire rack in the pan for about 10-15 minutes
  • Remove PUPcakes from pan and continue to cool completely on a wire rack
  • Refrigerate or freeze
    • PUPcakes will last about 3 weeks in the refrigerator, or approximately 6 months in the freezer
      • If freezing, be sure to thaw PUPcakes before serving

No One Fights Alone

Week 9 Recap and Oncology Visit #10

“When someone has cancer, the whole family, and everyone that loves them does too.”  ~Terri Clark

When we first found out about Margarita’s diagnosis, there was no question or hesitation for us to put all other things on hold if needed, and fight right alongside Rita in her biggest battle.  We vowed to do anything we could to help our 4-legged family member survive, as long as her medical advocates deemed the actions appropriate to continue to improve Rita’s quality of life. We are extremely fortunate to have an amazing medical team behind Rita, whom we trust wholeheartedly.  Our family has been understanding, encouraging, and sympathetic. Additionally, thanks to dog sports and social media, we are beyond blessed to have a large network of extended family and friends who have not only been equally supportive, but also have been invaluable resources.

That doesn’t mean we haven’t come across those who do not understand, or cannot relate to our efforts or our bond with our 4-legged family member.  I’ve been asked by people who don’t know our family well:  “You’re getting chemo for your…DOG?!?!”… “Is it really worth it?” … In keeping the tone of Margarita’s documented journey positive, I won’t even go there – just consider yourself extremely lucky if you are like us and have friends and family who support your efforts to help your fur-child fight such a serious disease.  At the same time, be prepared as a PAWrent to be criticized or questioned by those who “don’t get it,” and think your 4-legged child is “just a dog.”

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JUST A DOG

From time to time, people tell me, “lighten up, it’s just a dog,” or “that’s a lot of money for just a dog.” They don’t understand the distance traveled, the time spent, or the costs involved for “just a dog.”

Some of my proudest moments have come about with “just a dog.” Many hours have passed and my only company was “just a dog,” but I did not once feel slighted.

Some of my saddest moments have been brought about by “just a dog,” and in those days of darkness, the gentle touch of “just a dog” gave me comfort and reason to overcome the day.

If you, too, think it’s “just a dog,” then you will probably understand phrases like “just a friend,” “just a sunrise,” or “just a promise.”

“Just a dog” brings into my life the very essence of friendship, trust, and pure and unbridled joy.

“Just a dog” brings out the compassion and patience that makes me a better person.

Because of “just a dog,” I will rise early, take long walks and look longingly to the future. So for me and folks like me, it’s not “just a dog” but an embodiment of all the hopes and dreams of the future, the fond memories of the past, and the pure joy of the moment.

I hope that someday they can understand that it’s not “just a dog,” but the thing that gives me humanity and keeps me from being “just a woman.” So the next time you hear the phrase “just a dog,” just smile–because they “just don’t understand.”

~Author Unknown

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If you cross paths with those who don’t quite understand the love you have for your fur-child, you may start to doubt yourself – or may wind up feeling alone and helpless. In addition to the possibility of unsupportive friends and family, you could have financial constraints or other situations that may make chemotherapy difficult or impossible.  Remember:  NO ONE FIGHTS ALONE! There is support in each area that you can find elsewhere to assist you in your part of the battle to save your pup.  First and foremost, ask your veterinarian and/or oncologist if they can suggest any helpful and reputable emotional and/or financial support groups.  I’m sure there are others out there if you search, but below are some options for emotional, informational and financial support that I found either through a friend’s suggestion, or a quick Google Search.

Emotional or Informational Support:

  1. Put out a post on social media
    • You will be surprised at how many others have been through cancer with their pup, and can provide some very helpful tips and information
  2. Pick up a copy of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide
    • This book was recommended to us by a friend of ours whose dog also battled cancer
  3. A list of suggested reading from Help Your Dog Fight Cancer :
  4. Watch The Dog Cancer Series
    • Also recommended to our by a friend of ours whose dog also battled cancer
  5. Join a Facebook support group such as the examples below or search for groups on Facebook specific to your dog’s needs:

Financial Support 

  1. If you have pet insurance, contact them to see what they will cover
  2. Apply to CareCredit.
  3. Attempt to secure a bank loan.
  4. Contact the organizations below, or search for others:
    • The Magic Bullet Fund
      • Nationwide financial assistance for people who have a dog with cancer but cannot afford treatment costs.
    • The Pet Fund
      • Assists owners in covering medical costs beyond the normal expenses of vaccination, spay and neuter surgeries, food and routine veterinary care.
    • Brown Dog Foundation
      • This organization is dedicated to helping families who find themselves in a temporary financial crisis at the same time their pet requires life-saving treatment or life-sustaining medications.
    • The Onyx and Breezy Foundation
      • This is a privately run nonprofit started in memory of the founder’s dogs.  This foundation has helped animals in a variety of ways: from spay/neuter programs, to getting dogs on death row out of high-kill shelters, to providing emergency medical care to animals whose owners have fallen on hard times.
    • Breed-Specific Support
      • There are many rescue groups and associations that support specific dog breeds. Reach out to your local breed clubs for information on local, state and national groups involved in dog breed-specific veterinary care assistance programs. Examples include groups like CorgiAidSpecial Needs DobermansLabMedPit Bull Rescue Central.
    • Joshua Louis Animal Care Foundation
      • Assists owners of pets who are in need of cancer treatment.
    • The Mosby Fund
      • Provides financial assistance for dogs in need of critical care.
    • The Riedel & Cody Fund
      • Provides hope, knowledge and funding for owners of companion animals diagnosed with cancer.
    • RedRover Relief
      • Assists animals in crisis through emergency sheltering, disaster relief services, financial assistance and education.
    • Rose’s Fund
      • Financially assists pet owners and Good Samaritans who have an animal with a good prognosis for a healthy life, but are at a financial loss.

Week 9 Recap

The week following Oncology Visit #9 was a good one!  Rita experienced some mild diarrhea on day two after her treatment, but one Metronidazole did the trick, and she had normal bowl movements the rest of the week leading up to oncology visit #10.

If you have been following along with us for a while, you are probably tired of hearing me say how blessed we are to have found ourselves involved in GSP Rescue of NJ , Pointer Rescue, Org ,  and  DockDogs – and our ever-growing extended family that came about because of those groups.  I am blown away with the continued friendship, support, motivational messages, prayers, gifts, and gestures from these wonderful people.

This week, one of our extended-family members who attends daily mass lit a candle for Rita and prayed to St. Rita of Cascia on the St. Rita’s Feast Day this week (May 22).

Another one of our extended-family members sent us two of the “No One Fights Alone” Lymphoma bracelets from the Delmarva DockDogs Canine Cancer fund raiser she orchestrated in the name of our Sweet Reet at the last Delmarva DockDogs event.  This amazing woman had no idea that my “theme” this week was going to be No One Fights Alone!

 

Oncology Visit #10

On our way to VSEC with some new “bling!”

This week Margarita’s passed her physical exam with flying colors, and her CBC was normal (aside form the mild anemia that is continuously monitored).  Margarita’s chemotherapy this week is an oral medication that is administered by us at home.

This Week’s Treatment:

  • Cyclophosphamide 40mg
    • Give 2 tablets by mouth on 5/22, and 5/23 and 1 tablet by mouth on 5/24
      • Wear gloves
      • Do not split/crush tablets
    • This drug can cause some irritation to the bladder (called sterile hemorrhagic cystitis).  This week we will have to monitor Rita for straining during urination, urinating small amounts frequently, incontinence, or blood in her urine.

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This Week’s Treat

Margarita was excited to indulge in some grilled chicken nuggets and waffle fries from Chick-fil-A !

Grilled nuggets!!

Waffle fries!

Have a great week, everyone!

As always, thank you for joining Margarita in her journey to take a bite out Lymphoma.

 

 

Losing is NOT an Option

Week 8 Recap and Oncology Visit # 9

You beat cancer by the way you live, why you live, and the manner in which you live.”  ~ Stuart Scott

 

Week 8 Recap

Overall, Margarita has been a complete trooper though her chemo treatments.  In fact, I was beginning to think that we were on Easy Street.  No complications…halfway through the 16 week protocol …we got this, right?! But then Sunday night rolled around, and I began to think otherwise.

Last week, Rita had her “off-week” which means she only had to visit the oncology office to get blood work. We assumed this would be one of her best weeks, as it had been when she had her last “off-week.”  However, this was not the case.  On Mother’s Day evening (May 12), we noticed a drastic change in Margarita’s overall spirits, appetite, and energy level.  She had no interest in coming out of her crate, in eating – or anything for that matter.  She would not leave her crate, and if she did, she would only go as far as the dog bed next to her crate.  Sunday night she didn’t eat her dinner, would not get up to go outside, and would not sleep in bed with us.

I must admit, all my positive-thinking strategies went out the window, I slipped into immediate panic-mode, and thought the worst:  The chemo is not working, the cancer is spreading, she’s not going to make it….

Monday morning she was still exhibiting the same symptoms.  She had her weekly oncology appointment scheduled for the next day, Tuesday, but we were afraid to wait that long.  We took Rita to her primary veterinarian, Dr. Campbell, Monday evening.  Blood work was drawn and resulted in some less-than-desirable levels.  Her CBC revealed a very low neutrophil count (~600-700) and more concerning, showed that Rita’s body was producing premature red blood cells. We learned that this could mean several things:

  • her anemia could have worsened
  • she has infection
  • her body could be rejecting the chemo, or
  • there could be a bone marrow issue.

As long as her symptoms did not worsen, Dr. Campbell said it would be safe to wait for our oncology appointment the next day.

Margarita remained lethargic and uninterested in food Monday night into Tuesday morning.  Needless to say I was very anxious to get to the oncology appointment Tuesday afternoon. Although I felt like I prepared myself at the onset of Rita’s diagnosis by planning for the worst while hoping for the best, I was anything BUT prepared to see our Sweet Reet feeling so awful.

Oncology Visit # 9:  May 14, 2019

I had texted my mom a picture of Rita before leaving for the oncology visit, and let her know about Rita’s decline.  My 6 year old nephew, James, (who is also one of Rita’s biggest fans!) was at my mom’s house at the time, and had asked how Rita was doing. My mom told him that she wasn’t feeling very well at the moment, and James took it upon himself to stop what he was doing and pray for our Sweet Reet.

Brian left work early to meet us at VSECDr. Risbon reviewed Rita’s CBC from yesterday, and suspected that Rita had a late neutrophil nadir.  (A late what?!) We learned that instead of Rita’s white blood cell count dropping at the usual 7-day mark after her Adriamycin treatment, it dropped later (around the 10-day mark) leading to her side effects of lethargy and decreased appetite. Dr. Risbon also explained that the premature blood cell production was most likely Rita’s body responding to her increased anemia (common in dogs without spleens going through chemo). PHEW!  As soon as I saw that Dr. Risbon was not bothered by this setback, my state of panic lessened.

Dr. Risbon did some additional blood work upon our arrival to VSEC. Rita’s neutrophils were already at 4400 which was a good sign.  Margarita was also gobbling down every treat the oncology nurse was offering – also a great sign!  Dr. Risbon explained that the drop (and the rise) in Rita’s CBC results could happen pretty quickly, and Rita had already rebounded from the drop.  Since Rita has not had a fever and her counts were improving, Dr. Risbon held off on administering antibiotics.  Dr. Risbon decided it was best to postpone this week’s chemo treatment for another couple of days, so we rescheduled treatment for later in the week.  Dr. Risbon also dispensed Cerenia for Rita to take over the next 4 days to help Rita maintain a healthy appetite.

Medication:

  • Cerenia (24 mg (each)
    • Give 2 tablets by mouth once a day (every 24 hours) for nausea

What we experienced this week taught me that setbacks are not only OK,  but something to be celebrated. Why the heck would we celebrate a setback?? Setbacks are unpleasant, but are a blessing in disguise . They are wake up calls to remind us not to get too comfortable or too confident. Setbacks force us to stop, regroup, question, and most importantly learn. Analyzing and digesting setbacks is only going to make us more knowledgeable – and knowledge is power…the power needed to help our girl take an even BIGGER bite out of Lymphoma, and to turn her setbacks in to COMEbacks!

It’s normal to be upset when you see a loved one feeling so badly, and I am the first to admit that I am THE Queen of Panic.  It’s easy to lose focus and freak-out, thinking about the worst case scenario.  I realize now how important it is to stay grounded – that even though there will be road blocks we encounter along the way, it is imperative that we focus MORE on the faith we have in the superior medical team of Dr. Campbell and Dr. Risbon and the amazing strength and resilience of our Sweet Reet…  and less on the fears that cancer so easily implants in our minds.

Setbacks are nothing but a teaching tool to make you stronger…This was a very slight delay – a temporary detour…and no where near the defeat I had thought we were facing…. no matter how big the setbacks may be, we will figure it out, because losing is NOT an option.

Nice try, Cancer.  Our game isn’t over yet – and Margarita is still kicking your BUTT!!

 

Oncology Visit #9, Take 2:  May 16, 2019

Back to VSEC we go! …This time with Rita feeling much better.  Rita was completely back to herself:  eating normally, playing in the yard, and the sparkle was back in those sweet eyes!

Rita was in much better spirits, and was very excited to see her favorite oncology nurse, Sherri, who always carries treats for Sweet Reet!

Margarita’s physical examination was normal, and she even gained a little bit of weight!  A new CBC taken at this visit was acceptable for continued chemotherapy.

This Week’s Treatment

  • This week Margarita received Vincristine intravenously.
    • We will have to watch the site for any inflammation, oozing, or discharge.

This Week’s TreatS

It’s only fair that when you have two oncology visits in one week, you get TWO cheat-days!

After Rita’s initial weekly oncology visit on May 14th, we stopped at Sonic Drive-In !

Rita had been eating the treats from her oncology nurse at VSEC, so we ordered her a plain hot dog in hopes that her appetite was continuing to  increase.

Hot dog for the win! We were thrilled that she was eating again!

Keeping with our Drive-In treat theme, following oncology visit #2 on May 16, Rita and I stopped at Weber’s Root Beer , a “true” drive-in where you pull up, put your lights on for service, and a server brings out your order on a 1950’s metal tray that hooks to your window!

Weber’s has been around since 1951!

Rita’s order was a pork roll and cheese sandwich (or Taylor Ham for you North Jersey folk!) and fries…and  I ordered a root beer for my self!

YUM! Lip-smackin’ good!

Taking a bite out of her first pork roll sandwich:

Margarita decided she was not in the mood for the fries, and was most interested in the pork roll itself, so I pulled pieces of the meat out of the sandwich for her to enjoy.

 

 

Thank you for joining Margarita in her journey to take a bite out Lymphoma.